May your days be filled with light (and colors)!

The weekend that followed the New Year’s was (according to social media) a weekend of reflection and wishes for a better year. People sang goodbyes to 2020, leaving behind a year that challenged humanity and hoping for a better year full of joy, health and peace.

We wish you a year of light: 

  • For Red: Excitement, energy, passion
  • For Yellow: Enthusiasm, Happiness, positivity,
  • For Green: Growth, Safety, Harmony
  • For Blue: Wisdom, trust worth, Loyalty
  • For Indigo: Integrity, Devotion, Sincerity
  • For Violet: Imagination, Compassion, Sensitivity

Colors are encoded information for our brain.

Wherever you are now, the colors you see and what your human eye recognizes, shape your perception and wire a connection between your neurons. Your surrounding colors shape your perception of your environment (i.e. the correlation between rainy cities/ grey-skied cities for example and seasonal depression, or that yellow stimulates creativity and enthusiasm in the workplace, or that blue streetlights decrease criminal rate).

The colors we see or that our brains recognize are the result of the reflected wavelengths to our eyes. Research has scratched the surface of the complex relationship between the wavelengths of light in the visual spectrum and human experiences of color.

Colors and emotions are connected: the feelings that warm colors can evoke are different from the cool colors. Colors could also create associations: emotional triggers and thus shape our experiences and perception (the way sounds do too), and our relationship with our environment and space (and even particularly our cities).

For autistic and other neurodiverse communities, educators and therapists pay attention to color perception by their populations and the information it can convey.

For more information on how our brain reacts to colors, reach out and we’ll have our Neuroscience team get back to you.

Thank you for your curiosity!

 

 

Visual perception Checkpoint:

By the way what do you see?